Tomomi Nishimoto

Taipei Times

March 22. 2013
Taiwan
Taiwan
Taipei Times

An article featuring the Kaoshiung concert was posted on Taipei Times.

URL: http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2013/03/22/2003557671

Westchester Philharmonic Regular Concert Series Program Cover

October 20. 2011
USA
USA
Westchester Philharmonic

media info imageWestchester Philharmonic feautures Tomomi Nishimoto on the Regular Concert Series program cover.

Tuxedo-clad lady on the Podium Debuts

May 20. 2011
Russia
Russia
Statiya

media info imageOn May 12th at the Tchaikovsky Hall, a recently appointed principal guest conductor, Tomomi Nishimoto, took the podium in front of the Russian State Symphony Orchestra lead by Mark Gorenstein. Although she was promoted in the fall of last year, this became her first performance due to scheduling constraints on both sides. This day's concert program was centered around the 170th anniversary of Tchaikovsky's day of birth celebration. The program chosen to be of the audience favorites seemed most fitting for such debut performance.

Tomomi Nishimoto's approach was to use wide range of emotions and expressions and to communicate with the orchestra naturally. There was no such thing as a forcible motion evident in every part of the conducting, from the rich and smooth pianissimo to the well accented gestures for the fortissimo. In the series of short scores based from Ostrovsky's Snow Maiden, her interpretation of the score never spoiled the true beauty of the work. In the concert finale of Symphony No.5, she picked up on exactly what the composer intended to be heard, and brought out all this great master piece has to offer to the audience. Nishimoto's debut performance was welcomed by waves of standing ovations.

Princiapal Guest Conductor Leads the Russian State Symphony Orchestra

December 16. 2009
Russia
Russia
Pravda

media info imageWith a performance in Odessa and Chişinău, the Russian State Symphony Orchestra kicked off its 73rd season. They later went on to perform in Moscow, Tver, Volgograd, and Siberia. Most recently, they participated in the 10th Shelkunchik Competition.

Below lists the new ideas for performances that Mark Gorenstein (principal conductor of the People's Artists of Russia Symphony) and I discussed about:

Q: So far, the Russian State Symphony has performed in Russia and foreign countries near and far. Do the programs performed by the orchestra differ based on the specific region? If so, what kind of factors affect the decision making process for a program?

A: In most cases, the program is chosen by the hosting organization. We have to be give-in to their inputs, since they are the ones familiar with what the locals want to hear. For example, a program scheduled for December in China only consists of popular symphonies by Tchaikovsky, Glazunov, and Khachaturian. This is because the Chinese audiences want to hear familiar pieces for the end of the year concert. We just have to play what they want to hear. Of course, this decision is disregarding the performance qualities.

Q: The Russian State Symphony is scheduled to perform a ballet piece Estancia by Argentinean composer Alberto Ginastera in Moscow at the end of the year. What is the reason behind choosing a piece that most Moscow audiences may not be familiar with?

A: I once heard this piece on the radio. It was quite different from the others ones I have heard, and I developed a deep appreciation for its unique composition. That is why I wanted to introduce this to the people of Russia. I am sure that Ginastera's dances have never been previously performed in Russia. Honestly, it's just not one of those pieces that you will see on a December 27th concert poster. The three fragment program will also feature operetta Moscow, Cheryomushki by Dmitri Shostakovich and Not Love Only by Rodion Shchedrin. The piano will be played by Alexei Borodin. Although these scores may not be a typical end of the year concert pieces, it is already a "New Year" in my heart. And none of these scores have ever been in my repertoire, so it will be very interesting to me as well.

Q: It is unusual for a national orchestra to welcome a guest principal conductor and as far as I know, the Russian State Symphony will be having a guest conductor in the year 2010-2011 season. Who will this be?

A: It is Tomomi Nishimoto. She is well known in both Japan and Russia. She has an extremely unique sense of creativity and sees things not seen typically in a piece. I believe having her over will be a benefit to both Ms. Nishimoto and the orchestra. Of course, this decision was made mutually by the executive directors of the orchestra and the guest conductor.

The Conductor is a Japanese Woman

June 08. 2008
Monaco
Monaco
Monaco-Matin

Friday night, Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra faced a near sellout crowd in Auditorium Rainier III. The orchestra was led by a young Japanese woman still relatively unknown as a conductor, Tomomi Nishimoto. She donned a tailcoat in a slim feminine figure, and her hair bounced along with the tempo during the performance. The contrast between her delicate appearance and the powerful conducting attracted attentions. Under her direction, the famous Symphony No. 9 in E Minor "From the New World", Op. 95, by Antonín Dvořák was played with crisp and accurate tone, and the audiences could do nothing but be awed by the performance. Tomomi Nishimoto is a celebrity like figure in Japan, appearing in commercials from major computer, bicycle, motorcycle, and electronics manufacturers.

Japan Tour with Monte Carlo Philharmonic

Under Nishitmoto's direction, Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra will go on Japan Tour from June 16th to July 2nd. Until the tour begins, the orchestra and Nishimoto should be able to spend enough time together for preparation. A soloist that will accompany them on the Japan Tour is a renowned Japanese guitarist, Soichi Muraji. On Friday night, I was able to hear his performance. Muraji delicately performed the famous Concierto de Aranjuez. This piece's theme is to slowly change into a tune with less dynamics. It mesmerize the listeners into classical music with its this subtle beauty.

June 6th, 2008 Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra in Auditorium Rainier III in Monaco

Entering the Season with a Japanese Woman

September 17. 2007
Monaco
Monaco
Monaco-Matin

Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra will officially begin its 2007 concert season on September 30th with a concert by pianist, Nikolai Lugansky. Yesterday, a special concert was held at Auditorium Rainier III as a precursor to another season.

The conductor of the concert was surprisingly a young Japanese woman, Tomomi Nishimoto. She is a celebrity like figure in Japan. She appeared dressed in masculine attire, donning a tailcoat with sparkling sequins and pants.

How will this young woman with a beautiful yet flexible figure swing the baton? Will the orchestra be able to perform well under her direction? These were the concerns that I had that were soon addressed. There was no distortion in the tune that slowed its tempo to head into crescendo. The timing between her and the orchestra was perfect. After performing Ma Mère l'Oye, Carmen, From the New World, and completing program with an encore performance of Dvořák's Slavonic Dances, the heated audiences' hearts were all touched and the concert was a success.

This was a performance led by a conductor with a limitless talent.

September 16th, 2007 Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra in Auditorium Rainier III in Monaco

Waves of Applause to Tomomi Nishimoto

April 20. 2007
Austria
Austria
Österreich (Tageszeitung)

The delicately sensitive conductor fascinates even the orchestra.

The performance that the audiences in Brucknerhaus encountered was anything but usual.

The energetic orchestra conductor, Tomomi Nishimoto, has been active in this "field" since 1998, and is often regarded as "the most notorious conductor in Japan". Donning a simple tailcoat and moving calmly yet precisely, she looks like a beautiful young man of a Victorian Age. Inspired by such display, the ecstatic Bruckner Orchestra Linz churned out atypical performance to ride along with Nishimoto's passion and her near perfect skills. During Sergei Prokofiev's Classical Symphony, they displayed an aggressive environment of the time that the piece was written in. During Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major, the strength and delicacy of the tune was prevalent. But the most unique experience occurred after the break during Tchaikovsky's Symphony No.5 in E minor, Op.64.

The orchestra and the conductor became one big mass. Suddenly, the audiences were engulfed into the music and it made them feel as if they were no longer in this world. At the end, the waves of applause filled the venue.

April 18th, 2007 Bruckner Orchestra Linz Concert in Austria's Brucknerhaus

Young Magician atop the Podium, Tomomi Nishimoto, of Japan
Directs the Concert in Brucknerhaus

April 20. 2007
Austria
Austria
Neues Volksblatt

Despite the language barrier, a young Japanese female conductor with successful career in Russia, displayed a magnificent performance with the Bruckner Orchestra Linz. The brilliantly constructed program began with Sergei Prokofiev's Classical Symphony. This pulled out the true composition of the piece with careful articulation.

Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major merged the impressionist and George Gershwin style jazz qualities.

Benedetto Lupo put a fine show as well, accurately and precisely nailing even the quick and complicated passage. During the concerto, Nishimoto seemed to just play along with the score, only to burst into fury of originality during Tchaikovsky's Symphony No.5 in E minor. The Bruckner Orchestra Linz also put on an impressive performance. The French Horn played a perfect solo, and the well focused bass string rung out a splendid tune.

The audiences were surprised. As the Young Magician atop of Podium's expressiveness caught on with the orchestra, they flourished into pure perfection. Bravo!

April 18th, 2007 Bruckner Orchestra Linz Concert in Austria's Brucknerhaus

Dream Team Finally Formed

April 20. 2007
Austria
Austria
Oberösterreichische Nachrichten

Already well known for its renowned sound, Bruckner Orchestra Linz welcomed a Japanese Conductor Tomomi Nishimoto this Thursday to heighten its already impressive quality even more.

Reported by: Franz Zamazal

An admirable directing method, surprisingly expressive directing, and the stance that demands absolute precision could all be said to be her strength. The orchestra's and the soloists' (especially the clarinet and the French Horn!) sturdy precise performances were well balanced as well. To sum it all, it was a splendid performance that had the original theme and the conductor's original expression in a perfect harmony.

As soon as the performance began with Sergei Prokofiev's Classical Symphony, the audiences' expectations rose. The piece was performed with such dynamics and transparency that made Haydn's humorous touch oh so clear. There were no such thing as darkness, and it was quite comforting to both the heart and mind.

Sharp sensitivity to the sound

Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major was performed by a famous Italian soloist, Benedetto Lupo. In line with the impressionist's work, he produced soft durable sounds. He showed his impressive techniques and his sharp sensitivity to the sound. This made his solo sound as if it was only a part of the overall picture. The emotions played out well and precisely as well.

And the final climax was beyond what was expected. Tchaikovsky's Symphony No.5 in E minor was played as if it was a fully completed "Soul Art". At times, it exploded in emotions. At another, it showered the audiences with rich dynamics. It was a magnificent performance.

The performance emphasized some unusual parts of the score at times, though it just flew along perfectly with the overall theme; that is vibrant darkness of the soul. The orchestra got progressively tense, creating a dynamic effect that brushed against the soul. As a result, this performance is sure to be remembered for a long time by those who witnessed it. The conductor, soloists, and the orchestra were showered with applause.

I just hope that this conductor and Bruckner Orchestra Linz will work together again, soon.

April 18th, 2007 Bruckner Orchestra Linz Concert in Austria's Brucknerhaus